What Emotional Side Effects Do AML Patients Face?

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Topics include: Treatment | General , Treatments and Understanding

Typically, people have a strong emotional response to a sudden, and often shocking, acute leukemia diagnosis. How does an acute myeloid leukemia (AML) diagnosis affect a person’s emotional health? Patient advocate and Patient Power host Beth Probert is joined by leading AML expert Dr. Thomas LeBlanc, from Duke Cancer Institute, to explorethe emotional impact of AML on patients and discuss some commonly seen emotional responses to diagnosis and treatment. Tune in to find out more.

This is a Patient Empowerment Network program produced by Patient Power in partnership with The Leukemia & Lymphoma Society.  We thank Celgene Corporation, Daiichi Sankyo, Genentech, Helsinn and Novartis for their support.

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Please remember the opinions expressed on Patient Power are not necessarily the views of our sponsors, contributors, partners or Patient Power. Our discussions are not a substitute for seeking medical advice or care from your own doctor. That’s how you’ll get care that’s most appropriate for you.

Beth Probert:              

And we'll click back onto that. So, I'm gonna hop over now to Dr. LeBlanc. And could you go through, with your vast experience, what are the key emotional side effects that you see your AML patients facing day to day?

Dr. LeBlanc:              

Yeah, this is such an important question, and it's one that we don’t ask often enough, and we don’t talk about these issues very often, unfortunately. So, I'm really excited that we're having this webinar, first of all. And I'll tell you, it's important to recognize as well, every patient, every person is different. So, there is not one quintessential AML experience. That's really important to recognize.

But at the same time, when we have studied this issue and interviewed patients, and caregivers, and family members, there certainly have been some common themes that have come through about people's experiences. And one of the one that is, I think, particularly important to recognize is the sense of shock at this diagnosis. Now, acute leukemias, we call them acute because they tend to come on very quickly and suddenly.

And many of the patients we see will say things like, "I was fine three weeks ago. And now I can't even walk up a flight of stairs." And, "I'm so tired, I'm taking naps, this is not like me. I usually run marathons, and now I can only run a couple miles, something is going on." And this really degenerates, for many, people over the course of day or a few weeks.

And sometimes it means they end up urgently in the hospital and are told, "You can't leave. Something's going on, we don’t really know what it is, but we're concerned. You might have leukemia." And if they're not at a large medical center, they may get shipped off hours away from home to a place that's not familiar where they don’t know anyone.

So, that shock and suddenness of the diagnosis makes everything else much more difficult, and it sometimes creates, even, social isolation related to where AML is treated. Where it tends to be treated more so at academic centers than it is in the community, although, certainly, some of these treatments are provided in the community.

But patients getting high-dose therapies do tend to come to large research centers. So, we've certainly seen that issue impact many patient's experiences. The other one that comes up quite often, that really compounds the decision making and the emotional difficulties, is the issue of uncertainty. So, unlike many cancers, we really don’t know what to expect when a person is diagnosed with AML. And everyone asks, "Well, what stage is this?" and we don’t really have stages for this disease.

We, certainly, have ways that we can try to get a sense for what we might expect for the patient who's sitting before us. And we do all kinds of fancy testing, and we talk at length about those issues, but at the same time, we really can't say what's going to happen to you, my patient sitting across from me who I'm trying to help guide through the process.

And there are actually a lot more risks associated with leukemia treatments as you heard Jim talk about. A stem-cell transplant is a difficult and risky process, and sometimes that's part of curing AML, or hoping to cure AML. But even high-dose chemotherapies in the hospital, some people actually do have really difficult complications, and even can die from those treatments, and yet, those are the treatments that usually are required to cure a person.

So, we have to have these difficult decisions made sometimes under a lot of distress emotionally, and amid the suddenness of this diagnosis, where we say, this is probably the best treatment for you, and it gives you a chance at cure, but it's not a guarantee. And some people end up not making it out of the hospital. And usually what happens is, that's just such difficult information. Many folks shut down and they say, "I don't know, what should I do. Tell me what to do."

Or they'll turn to a family member or a friend who might or might not be around and available during that difficult time, especially if they're in another city away from home. So, these are some of the things we'll commonly see when patients are newly diagnosed with AML.

Please remember the opinions expressed on Patient Power are not necessarily the views of our sponsors, contributors, partners or Patient Power. Our discussions are not a substitute for seeking medical advice or care from your own doctor. That’s how you’ll get care that’s most appropriate for you.

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Page last updated on March 26, 2019