Understanding AML Treatment: What to Expect During a Clinical Trial

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Topics include: Living With Acute Myeloid Leukemia

What is the clinical trial process like? Expert Dr. Uma Borate, from the Oregon Health & Science University, and Amanda Fowler, from The Leukemia & Lymphoma Society (LLS), discuss aspects of trial preparation and participation for acute myeloid leukemia (AML) patients.  

This is a Patient Empowerment Network program in partnership with The Leukemia & Lymphoma Society produced by Patient Power. We thank Celgene, Daiichi Sankyo, Jazz Pharmaceuticals and Novartis for their support. These organizations have no editorial control.

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Transcript

Please remember the opinions expressed on Patient Power are not necessarily the views of our sponsors, contributors, partners or Patient Power. Our discussions are not a substitute for seeking medical advice or care from your own doctor. That’s how you’ll get care that’s most appropriate for you.

So you're doing clinical trials, and many of your peers at other academic medical centers are doing clinical trials, and that's what led to the approval of these drugs by the FDA based on data that you as researchers and drug companies and National Cancer Institute were able to present.  So talk to us a little bit about what's in the lab, if you will, that you may be offering patients in clinical trials.  And then we'll also understand, Amanda, when somebody is in a clinical trial what costs may be covered, too, okay?  

So, Dr. Borate, first, what's going on in research?  

When we start somebody on a clinical trial we always collect what we call a pretreatment sample.  So we'll get a sample of their disease before they've had any treatment, and then along the way as this treatment progresses we get multiple what we call post-treatment treatment samples, one to look at the status of their disease, and secondly to send the sample then back to the lab to understand how these new treatments are affecting the disease.  You know, what pathways in these leukemia cells are being inhibited so that the cells are dying?  What pathways are deactivated, which also helps the cell to die?  

And then thirdly, what pathways are being sort of turned on to help the cell resist these treatments. We call them mechanism of resistance and it's similar to the antibiotic analogy you said where you take an antibiotic for a while and it seems to be working initially but then your body develops resistance to it and so the provider or the doctor has to change therapy because now this drug no longer works for your infection.   

And so the same thing happens with leukemia or any cancer, and I think it's very important for us to observe the samples as the patient progresses through therapy so we can figure out, first of all, why it worked, but also why did it stop working or why did it not work.  And I think that's where participation in clinical trials is so critical because without this valuable information we really can't move the field forward.  

Please remember the opinions expressed on Patient Power are not necessarily the views of our sponsors, contributors, partners or Patient Power. Our discussions are not a substitute for seeking medical advice or care from your own doctor. That’s how you’ll get care that’s most appropriate for you.

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Page last updated on August 21, 2019