How Long Can CLL Patients Expect to Have Treatment?

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Topics include: Treatments

How long will chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) therapy last? Does treatment duration vary with novel agents? At a recent Town Meeting in Portland, expert Dr. Michael Choi joined Patient Power to discuss treatment duration and patient response with different CLL regimens. Watch now to learn more about FCR treatment for CLL and more.

This town meeting is sponsored by Pharmacyclics LLC and Janssen Biotech, Inc. It is produced by Patient Power in partnership with The CLL Global Research Foundation, The US Oncology Network, Compass Oncology, Willamette Valley Cancer Institute and Research Center, and The Leukemia & Lymphoma Society (LLS).

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Transcript

Please remember the opinions expressed on Patient Power are not necessarily the views of our sponsors, contributors, partners or Patient Power. Our discussions are not a substitute for seeking medical advice or care from your own doctor. That’s how you’ll get care that’s most appropriate for you.

Andrew Schorr:          

Okay. How long can I expect to have treatment? Dr. Choi, you’ve been involved in a lot of these drugs, just like Dr. Sharman and the development of it. So, there are some, like the original FCR, six months and done if it worked for you or BR, be done with it, and then ibrutinib (Imbruvica), that you continue on, or some other combinations that maybe you’ll be able to stop. Can you talk about that? How long do you need treatment? 

Dr. Choi:                     

You’re exactly right. The regimens vary. Some are intended to be a start and planned duration of treatment. In the past, those were typically the chemotherapy-type regimens, FCR or BR. Ibrutinib is a drug that doesn’t act by damaging or interfering with DNA and we have seen that as something that can be safely taken for a long time. So, we know that duration of remission or the control of disease is best when ibrutinib is continued. 

So, that’s a drug that we intend people take as long as works and as long as it’s tolerated. I think newer regimens may come out that—sometimes we even change how we use drugs. 

In the past, we use venetoclax (Venclexta) as a long-term therapy also, but now we’ve found that patients that have very good remissions that have remissions that have no detectable residual disease, that we can stop that and not see a relapse for most patients, or at least for a few years, we hope. So, I think yeah, I guess it depends on which regimen comes on and possibly how good their response is to that treatment. 

Please remember the opinions expressed on Patient Power are not necessarily the views of our sponsors, contributors, partners or Patient Power. Our discussions are not a substitute for seeking medical advice or care from your own doctor. That’s how you’ll get care that’s most appropriate for you.

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Page last updated on August 30, 2019