How Is the AML Treatment Landscape Evolving?

Published on

Topics include: Treatments

What’s happening in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) treatment research? Noted AML expert Dr. Thomas LeBlanc, from Duke Cancer Institute, gives an encouraging update on new approaches to AML treatment, patient outcomes and the role of genetic profiling in AML care. Michelle Rajotte, from The Leukemia and Lymphoma Society (LLS), also shares ways the LLS can help connect AML patients to upcoming clinical trials.

This is a Patient Empowerment Network (PEN) program produced by Patient Power in partnership with The Leukemia & Lymphoma Society.  We thank Celgene Corporation, Daiichi Sankyo, Genentech, Helsinn and Novartis for their financial support through grants to PEN. These organizations have no editorial control.

View more programs featuring , and

Produced in association with and

Transcript

Please remember the opinions expressed on Patient Power are not necessarily the views of our sponsors, contributors, partners or Patient Power. Our discussions are not a substitute for seeking medical advice or care from your own doctor. That’s how you’ll get care that’s most appropriate for you.

Beth Probert:              

So, Dr. LeBlanc; I would like to now go back to you. And could you tell us, in regard to treatments, advances in clinical trials for AML, what's happening in research and should patients be hopeful?

Dr. LeBlanc:              

Yeah, it's really a very tremendous time in cancer care and in biomedicine in general. As I mentioned earlier, we had, if I remember correctly, eight new drugs approved for AML in the last two years. And we had been mostly using the same treatment for patients for the prior 40 years. The seven plus three induction regimen was developed in the '60s or early '70s, and mostly that's the same regiment or related ones to it that we've been giving to people when we give them high-dose therapies for this disease.

Other things have improved during that time, as well, that are really improving outcomes, so we have much better supportive care medicines. We have growth factor injections that work better. We have better antibiotics. We have anti-fungal medicines that work a lot better.

So, when you add those developments, even to the old chemotherapy, that had improved outcomes prior to this spirt of approvals in the last two years, but now, especially, we really are in a new era of how we treat AML. And now, we need to actually molecularly and genetically profile each individual patient's leukemia, so that we can best know how to treat their disease because at this point, we have several testable targets that we might then prescribe a medication to address in an individual person's case of AML. So, it's getting more complicated, at yet at the same time, there are many more options, and it really is a time to be very hopeful about how things are going.

Beth Probert:              

That sounds so encouraging. And, Michelle, going back to you. How can you lead clients and their care givers to these clinical trials that are on the horizon?

And can you talk a little bit about what that process looks like?

Michelle Rajotte:        

Sure. If someone reaches out the IRC, we do have a group of nurses who do clinical trial searches specifically for blood cancers. And it's not just, we're gonna hand you a list as say, "Here, go talk to your doctor." They will help through the process. So, they'll really in-depth dig, and try to find trials that might be an option. Have you go back to your doctor, but then walk through it with you to help you get into that trial.

Because there's so much research now, it's wonderful, but it's also really overwhelming if you try to do it by yourself. And a lot of them are more focused trials now, so you have to know what kind of mutations you have and that kind of thing. So, it's a partnership where there's a form that you would need to fill out for us to have that information, and then we help you walk through that process of, is there a trial that's out there for you; is it something that's appropriate for you, along with your doctor. And then, how do we help you make sure that you can get through the whole process.

Please remember the opinions expressed on Patient Power are not necessarily the views of our sponsors, contributors, partners or Patient Power. Our discussions are not a substitute for seeking medical advice or care from your own doctor. That’s how you’ll get care that’s most appropriate for you.

Related Programs

AML Treatment Developments: Key Takeaways From ASH 2018

In 2018, there were more changes in AML treatment than in the last 40 years. Watch as Dr. Naval Daver explains some of the research and treatment news from ASH 2018 and beyond.

Published:

Emerging Research and Promising AML Treatment Approaches

What’s new in AML research? Watch as AML expert Dr. Naval Daver, Leah Szumita and AML patient Steve Buechler discuss new therapies targeted toward specific genetic mutations.

Published:

Clinical Trial Participation: Propelling Advances in AML Treatment

Can you help in the advancement in the treatment of AML? Experts speak on the importance of clinical trials and how they can improve advancement of AML treatments for all patients.

Published:

Advertisement
Join Our Community Register for Events Read Our Latest Blog
Advertisement

Page last updated on September 4, 2019