How Important Is It to Measure Changes in Scarring in the Bone Marrow?

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MPN experts from MD Anderson Cancer Center discuss scarring in the bone marrow while monitoring MPNs (myeloproliferative neoplasms).  Dr. Srdan Verstovsek explains how change is, or should, be measured within the bone marrow environment while Dr. Carlos Bueso-Ramos describes monitoring within the context of eliminating disease. 

 

The Ask the Expert series is sponsored through an education grant to the Patient Empowerment Network from Incyte Corporation.

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Please remember the opinions expressed on Patient Power are not necessarily the views of our sponsors, contributors, partners or Patient Power. Our discussions are not a substitute for seeking medical advice or care from your own doctor. That’s how you’ll get care that’s most appropriate for you.

Andrew Schorr:

Well, the big question now, Dr. Verstovsek, is if he sees scarring in the bone marrow in my sample, with the newer medicines that are out or may be coming is it critical to see, to measure where there's less scarring another time?  I'm—you know if I'm doing better, spleen shrunk, feeling better, whatever the situation may be with symptoms, do you need to do that to look? 

This is an investigational part of clinical studies, not really ready for prime time at this point in time.  We have evidence that some of the new therapies may change the bone marrow for better over the years that the patients are exposed to these new therapies, but in general we don't do this in everyday practice. 

Say you are a cell, the cement where you're sitting down, this ground substance is called the abnormal deposition of this cement.  It's called collagen.  Collagens type 1 and type 3 are normally not increased except around the blood vessels in your normal bone marrow.  So any increase about that area, straying into all the parts of this home… 

Please remember the opinions expressed on Patient Power are not necessarily the views of our sponsors, contributors, partners or Patient Power. Our discussions are not a substitute for seeking medical advice or care from your own doctor. That’s how you’ll get care that’s most appropriate for you.

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Page last updated on May 29, 2014