How Can Patients Manage Daily Stress of Life With AML?

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Topics include: Living With Acute Myeloid Leukemia

Patient Power community member Shannon writes in, “Are there proven strategies to cope with the stress of AML?” Noted AML expert Dr. Thomas LeBlanc, from Duke Cancer Institute, gives recommendations for those struggling with emotional distress and explains how palliative care specialists can help AML patients feel and live better.

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Please remember the opinions expressed on Patient Power are not necessarily the views of our sponsors, contributors, partners or Patient Power. Our discussions are not a substitute for seeking medical advice or care from your own doctor. That’s how you’ll get care that’s most appropriate for you.

Beth Probert:

And, Dr. LeBlanc, we have a question from Shannon from Boston, and her questions is, "How can I manage the daily stress of like with AML? Are there proven strategies to cope with the stress?" So, we did talk about a few things earlier, but what advice would you give Shannon?

Dr. LeBlanc:        
Yeah, I'm not aware of proven strategies specifically for AML, which is part of where we all struggle. Not knowing what to do and how to best support individual patients. And as I mentioned earlier, every individual is quite different. but I usually recommend meeting with a professional to talk about it. And some people are opposed to that and they don’t want to do that, but more people are at least open to the idea. And so, Shannon, if you're somebody who's open to that idea, I would actually encourage you to seek out a specialist in palliative medicine.

And many people misunderstand what that means. So, I want to just take a moment to explain why I would think that'd be helpful and what the evidence shows. So, clinicians who are trained in palliative medicine are basically experts on well-being.

They know how to address symptoms, they know how to help with quality of life maintenance, and they know how to help people cope with difficult diagnoses and serious illnesses like cancers. Regardless of the expected outcome. So, they can be helpful if we're aiming at cure and we think there's a really good chance of that, and they can be helpful in cases where we know that's not gonna happen, and anywhere in between.

So, one of the misconceptions is that they can only be helpful when people are dying, but actually, what we found in a lot of research is that when you add a palliative care specialist to the cancer care team, even from the point of diagnosis, that patients feel better, and they do better, and even live longer. Several studies, now, have shown that in a recent medi-analysis that we publish, for example.

So, part of the mechanism by which palliative care specialists help patients feel better and live better is not only by addressing physical symptoms, but also at addressing these difficult emotional and existential kinds of issues.

Helping with coping. How do I get through the day; how do I live with the fear that this diagnosis instills in me; how do I enjoy life? Those kinds of questions are very common. And palliative care specialists are often very equipped at helping. Or even psychologists would be another great resource, where this is a person you're going to see where the entire focus of the visit on those issues, so that they definitely don’t get pushed to the last 30 seconds of the visit when the doctor has their hand on the door knob and they're trying to get out to the next patient. 

Please remember the opinions expressed on Patient Power are not necessarily the views of our sponsors, contributors, partners or Patient Power. Our discussions are not a substitute for seeking medical advice or care from your own doctor. That’s how you’ll get care that’s most appropriate for you.

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Page last updated on September 4, 2019