Factors to Consider When Setting CLL Treatment Goals

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Topics include: Treatments

How do doctors approach setting chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) treatment goals? Expert Dr. Jeffrey Menashe, from Compass Oncology,joined Patient Power at a recent town meeting to discuss indications for CLL therapy and conversations to have with your healthcare team when choosing a course of care. Watch now to find out more from a CLL medical expert.

This town meeting is sponsored by Pharmacyclics LLC and Janssen Biotech, Inc. It is produced by Patient Power in partnership with The CLL Global Research Foundation, The US Oncology Network, Compass Oncology, Willamette Valley Cancer Institute and Research Center, and The Leukemia & Lymphoma Society (LLS).

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Transcript

Please remember the opinions expressed on Patient Power are not necessarily the views of our sponsors, contributors, partners or Patient Power. Our discussions are not a substitute for seeking medical advice or care from your own doctor. That’s how you’ll get care that’s most appropriate for you.

Andrew Schorr:          

This is a cancer diagnosis. We have to be very realistic that some people have passed on and I’ve known people along the way that it was from their CLL. Okay? But largely, we’ve been doing better. That’s a great thing. So, let’s go on and talk about how we understand what are the goals of treatment. 

So, Dr. Menashe, so, there you are—you have somebody who is no longer doing so well and maybe they have the swollen lymph nodes. They come in and say, “You know, I have night sweats, and the sheets are all wet, and I don’t have energy.” So, you have a variety of treatments now. So, do you have a discussion with them about the goals of treatment?  

Dr. Menashe:              

Yes. Certainly, goals are important to establish for a person with this. In the beginning, if there’s no imminent threat, the goal would be to continue as high quality of life as possible, which usually would be not doing treatment. Once an imminent threat is established, either from constitutional symptoms, just feeling very weak or having fevers, weight loss, not being able to maintain high quality of life, blood count issues, then that would be an indication that treatment might be of near-term benefit. 

Andrew Schorr:          

Okay. And then now, we have a mix of infused therapies and oral therapies, sometimes combined. So, some of it might be a discussion of, “Do you want to come to the clinic regularly for an infusion? Or do you want to take pills at home?” 

Dr. Menashe:              

Definitely. 

Andrew Schorr:          

That’s part of the discussion as well.  

Dr. Menashe:              

Yes.

Please remember the opinions expressed on Patient Power are not necessarily the views of our sponsors, contributors, partners or Patient Power. Our discussions are not a substitute for seeking medical advice or care from your own doctor. That’s how you’ll get care that’s most appropriate for you.

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Page last updated on September 19, 2019