Can High-Risk Myeloma Patients Become Refractory to Certain Monoclonal Antibodies?

Published on

Topics include: Treatments

Patient Power Community member, Francis, asks â??Can refractory, high-risk myeloma patients become refractory to daratumumab?â?? Dr. Jatin Shah from the University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center responds to this question and goes on to discuss promising treatment options in clinical trials, specifically related to immunotherapy and checkpoint inhibitors.

Clinical Trials Mentioned in This Video

High-Risk Multiple Myeloma Clinical Trials
daratumumab (Darzalex)
Immunotherapy Clinical Trials
Refractory Multiple Myeloma Clinical Trials

This Ask the Expert series is sponsored by the Patient Empowerment Network, which received funding from Celgene, Novartis and Takeda.

View more programs featuring and

Produced in association with

Transcript

Please remember the opinions expressed on Patient Power are not necessarily the views of our sponsors, contributors, partners or Patient Power. Our discussions are not a substitute for seeking medical advice or care from your own doctor. That’s how you’ll get care that’s most appropriate for you. 

Andrew Schorr:

Here is a question we got in from Francis, she wants to know, can refractory, high-risk multiple myeloma patients become refractory to daratumumab (Darzalex)? 

That’s a great question. I think that unfortunately right now, as we know it, myeloma is not curable. And that means unfortunately, the myeloma will become refractory to almost all of our therapies, including lenalidomide or Velcade or carfilzomib (Kyprolis) or pomalidomide (Pomalyst) or elotuzumab (Empliciti) or panobinostat (Farydak) and even daratumumab. So, unfortunately, even though daratumumab is a very good drug, unfortunately the myeloma becomes smart, those cells become smart, and they’re going to be refractory to daratumumab just like everything else.

And it doesn’t matter if you have high risk or not high risk. I think at the end of the day, unfortunately, those myeloma cells will at some point become refractory to daratumumab. So I think the answer is yes. And that really starts bringing up the question about what do we do next? And I think it’s important when you start talking about daratumumab, I think it’s a great drug. There’s lots of excitement about it, and people are using it as a single agent right now.

And so even in that setting when peopleare using it as a single agent by itself, the response rate is around 30 percent. So even when there’s lots of excitement about it, I think we have to be realistic saying as a single agent, it only works in about 30 percent of patients, and it works for about four months for patients. And so ultimately, all these patients do become refractory to daratumumab. So it’s a great drug, a great step forward. We see even better activity when you combine it as we move forward. So I think that’s important.

There are a lot of new drugs that have been approved last year, and so there are other options, which I don’t know what you have or have not had in the past.

But I think clearly, it does kind of start talking about what’s the next wave of new drugs coming after that, after the daratumumab, and I think that’s where I want to share some of the excitement that we have. That even once you become refractory to daratumumab, within a clinical trial setting there [are] lots of options that we have in that setting. And that starts getting into this whole world of immunotherapy.

There [are] lots of new drugs that are coming that really target the immune system to activate the immune system. Drugs like checkpoint inhibitors, for example, are very active, and we saw some very nice data at ASH, some preliminary data that was very exciting. So I think there [are] a number of new options that are coming down—other small molecules, as well, that are going to be available in clinical trials after daratumumab.

Please remember the opinions expressed on Patient Power are not necessarily the views of our sponsors, contributors, partners or Patient Power. Our discussions are not a substitute for seeking medical advice or care from your own doctor. That’s how you’ll get care that’s most appropriate for you. 

Related Programs

Published:

Published:

Published:

Advertisement
Join Our Community Register for Events Read Our Latest Blog
Advertisement

Page last updated on July 17, 2017