ASCO 2017: Lung Cancer Research and Treatment News Highlights

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Topics include: Treatment

Lung cancer experts, Dr. David Carbone and Dr. George Simon, meet with Host Andrew Schorr at the 2017 ASCO meeting to discuss meaningful news for lung cancer patients. Dr. Simon says that we will see exciting data in the near future regarding treatment for lung cancer patients as medicine combinations and immunotherapies are being studied. Dr. George Simon is a Professor in the Department of Thoracic/Head and Neck Medical Oncology in the Division of Cancer Medicine at MD Anderson Cancer Center and Dr. David Carbone is the Director of the James Thoracic Center at Ohio State University.

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Please remember the opinions expressed on Patient Power are not necessarily the views of our sponsors, contributors, partners or Patient Power. Our discussions are not a substitute for seeking medical advice or care from your own doctor. That’s how you’ll get care that’s most appropriate for you.

Andrew Schorr:

George, let's get to the kind of the flow of news a little bit.  I know even here at this meeting some hasn't come out yet. You've had other lung cancer meetings leading up to this, so these are the questions you're trying to answer.  For patients living with lung cancer today, then, where is the news headed that can give them hope, these questions you're trying to answer, that could make a difference in the near term? 

Dr. Simon:

So in the near term, I think we'll see some exciting data come out in the next day or so.  More recently, we have now seen data with the combination of chemotherapy and pembrolizumab (Keytruda) showing very good efficacy in terms of…

Andrew Schorr:

One of these immunotherapies. 

Dr. Simon:

…one of these immunotherapies, and in a subset of patients when they combined chemotherapy and immunotherapy the results were very promising.  And so that is one of the recent developments that is exciting. 

We also have learned from a recent publication just about a week or two ago where sometimes you may be able to augment the efficacy of pembrolizumab, one of these immunotherapies, by giving them some radiation first.  In retrospective analysis they found that patients who got radiation for some reason, for, say, a painful area or to the brain and then got pembrolizumab, they seemed to get more effect out of it. 

So these are things that we are trying to understand as how sometimes we can use the various tools in the shed that can be optimally combined to get optimal results. 

Andrew Schorr:

So combination of medicines but combination of modalities as well. 

Dr. Carbone: 

Radiation and surgery.  There are studies that are looking at immunotherapy in patients who have resectable tumors as well.  

Please remember the opinions expressed on Patient Power are not necessarily the views of our sponsors, contributors, partners or Patient Power. Our discussions are not a substitute for seeking medical advice or care from your own doctor. That’s how you’ll get care that’s most appropriate for you.

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Page last updated on July 11, 2017