Are Cosmetic Procedures Safe for CLL Patients?

Published on

Topics include: Treatments

Is it safe to have cosmetic procedures or to dye your hair when you are a chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) patient?  Dr. Nicole Lamanna of Columbia University Medical Center answers this question.  Dr. Lamanna stresses that CLL patients should keep their specialist in the loop when considering cosmetic procedures.

Sponsored through an educational grant from the Patient Empowerment Network, which received support from AbbVie Inc. and Genentech Inc.

View more programs featuring and

Produced in association with

Transcript

Please remember the opinions expressed on Patient Power are not necessarily the views of our sponsors, contributors, partners or Patient Power. Our discussions are not a substitute for seeking medical advice or care from your own doctor. That’s how you’ll get care that’s most appropriate for you. 

Andrew Schorr:

Many people with CLL are getting older, get some wrinkles, maybe we're going to try Botox.  Are Botox and other fillers safe for people with CLL?  

Dr. Lamanna:

Oh, that's a good question.  We really don't know.  You know, we have no idea, to be fair.  People do a lot of cosmetic procedures.  We could talk about a lot of questions we usually get surrounding hair dyeing.  

Andrew Schorr:

Right.  

Dr. Lamanna:

Is that safe for—you know, can you develop incidence, a higher incidence of cancer with hair dyes?  Also implants, things like that, we really to be fair don't have a lot of data on any of this. 

However, I will—since the person is asking about Botox injections in particular or injections, the one thing that's important if you're on some of the new agents like ibrutinib (Imbruvica) you might need to stop—you might need to stop your therapies because the ibrutinib can predispose to a little bleeding complications, and you could get some bruising and issues with the Botox injections. 

So you might want to talk to your doctor about if you're going to be doing any of these other cosmetic procedures if you're taking medicines, or depending upon your blood counts at least have your CLL doctor know what's going on, so they can make sure that it's safe for the procedure.  But we don't know if there's a causality of, you know, getting injections, does that mean that you can get either other cancers or CLL?  We have no idea. 

Please remember the opinions expressed on Patient Power are not necessarily the views of our sponsors, contributors, partners or Patient Power. Our discussions are not a substitute for seeking medical advice or care from your own doctor. That’s how you’ll get care that’s most appropriate for you. 

Related Programs

How Do Autoimmune Diseases Affect CLL?

CLL specialist, Dr. Nicole Lamanna, answers a question about treatment options for CLL patients with autoimmune diseases.

Published:

Why Is CLL So Varied?

Drs. Nicole Lamanna and Philip Thompson explain genetic variances and abnormalities in CLL cells.

Published:

Advertisement
Join Our Community Register for Events Read Our Latest Blog
Advertisement

Page last updated on December 23, 2016