A Myeloma Patient Shares: What’s for Dinner Tonight?

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For many multiple myeloma patients, nutrition plays a fundamental role in their care plan. What can patients eat for everyday health and well-being? Are there foods known to benefit a myeloma condition? Watch now to get healthy recipe ideas from survivor and patient advocate Danny Parker. 

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Please remember the opinions expressed on Patient Power are not necessarily the views of our sponsors, contributors, partners or Patient Power. Our discussions are not a substitute for seeking medical advice or care from your own doctor. That’s how you’ll get care that’s most appropriate for you. 

Andrew Schorr:

Okay. Danny, you mentioned about apples. What are your favorite fruits, and how about some of these vegetables, Danny?

Danny Parker: 

I'm a big advocate on blueberries because they contain an organic compound called pterostilbene, and this pterostilbene looks like it's actually been used experimentally to try to control certain myeloma strains in its profound anti-cancer capabilities.

It doesn't mean that it's going to stop your myeloma. I mean, one of the things I'd like to mention in the program at least once is if there were food as that were gonna cure the condition you had, people would be eating blueberries and going into spontaneous remission.

That said, there are probably foods that consuming a good amount of these, as Julie's suggesting, will probably help you in ways that might be subtle and difficult to tell. I'm a big advocate of blueberries, for instance, with a dollop of yogurt, something like that.

A very healthy breakfast gets you off to a start. The yogurt, actually, there's some evidence that it helps you with the bacteria that lives in your gut that helps digest, and it actually looks like that may have something to do with whether we're happy or not, some unusual stuff that I've been reading about.

The other thing is, as myeloma patients, we may end up taking antibiotics, which play havoc with the biotic material that we have in our gut. We want something that will help replace that. Yogurt and berries, I'm a big advocate of that. Papaya, I think, is very nice.

One thing to mention is even though everyone will be—smoothies may be a great thing to be able to tolerate when you're having difficulty tolerating something else, like, say, after a stem cell transplant, but eating the whole fruit is actually a lot better, I think, in terms of the way our bodies are designed to digest food slowly. It may not be as much fun for you, but I think that that would be a good choice.

Andrew Schorr: 

Danny, time is short, but I just have to do this. Could you tell us one of your favorite recipes? If you were gonna make dinner tonight, and you're looking forward to it, and it enriches you, what are you getting? What are you making? Because my mouth is watering just thinking about what you're gonna say.

Danny Parker:   

Well, I make various things. I'm actually thinking about a chicken dish, excuse me. I'm not a vegetarian. It's a famous French dish that uses butter again, which I don't use, but this is you sauté the chicken breast, and so they're skinless, and then you sauté them quickly.

Then, you make little caps of them with breadcrumbs, parmesan cheese, and the—vitamin K, too, that's another advantage, potentially, for myeloma, but little caps of breadcrumbs and parmesan cheese.

You put them in the oven, and you surround them with—you pour some white wine around them, and you broil them for a short period of time, and they come out. The wine reduces, and it's absolutely phenomenal in terms of its paste. Anyway, I sent the recipes to Tamara. That's one.

Then, a blueberry crisp. I love that because you can make a desert that has very little added sugar. You can have some sugar in it. You can make that, and it'll absolutely taste—it'll have a phenomenal flavor, and you'll really be able to enjoy it. You won't feel like, "Oh, I'm being cheated by anything. I'm living large."

Please remember the opinions expressed on Patient Power are not necessarily the views of our sponsors, contributors, partners or Patient Power. Our discussions are not a substitute for seeking medical advice or care from your own doctor. That’s how you’ll get care that’s most appropriate for you. 

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Page last updated on April 3, 2018