Published on

Loading the player...

In the early stages of life making sure children are safe, happy and healthy is at the top of every parents list. The first three years of life are critical in determining what a child's specific needs are, including abnormalities in behavior and interaction. One specific condition parents are becoming more sensitive to is autism. Autism is a neurological disorder that impacts the functioning and development of the brain, severely impacting social interaction and communication skills. With frequent headlines and numerous publications about autism, parents are increasingly aware of this condition. When the diagnosis is positive, parents are left with more questions than answers. These questions are usually: how will I know what is best for my child? What resources are available? As a parent of an autistic child, Ann Rosas knows these questions all too well.

In this Patient Power program, hear Ann’s courageous story of the challenges she faced being a parent of an autistic child, how this affected her family and advice to other parents who have autistic children. Ann admits that the diagnosis answered many questions and was somewhat of a relief, ultimately helping her to give Luke the proper care he needed. Fortunately, we have experts that shed light on this condition that, according to the Autism Society of America, is the fastest-growing developmental disability in America.

Dr. Gary Stobbe a neurologist specializing in autism at the Minor and James Clinic at Swedish Medical Center in Seattle, joins the program to help parents understand how to deal with a difficult diagnosis like autism. Dr. Stobbe speaks about the long journey to diagnosis, team approaches to autism, and offers advice on finding effective resources. Also sharing her expertise is Trina Westerlund, executive director of Children’s Institute for Learning Differences (CHILD). Trina emphasizes the role of parental involvement and what actions and transitions are necessary immediately after the diagnosis and beyond. This program is a positive dialogue that underlines the challenges for parents with an autistic child and brings clarity to current and ongoing autism research.

View more programs featuring , and

Produced in association with Children's Institute for Learning Differences (CHILD)

Transcript

Andrew Schorr:

Good morning wherever you may be across the country. This is Andrew Schorr broadcasting live on Health Radio Network. I'm here every week talking about important health topics. We're going to talk about two today. First, briefly, we're going to get a live report from the big cancer meeting. 30,000 cancer doctors from around the country are meeting in Atlanta this weekend, and our correspond is there, Carol Adams Gere. We'll hear from Carol in a second.

And then we're going to delve into kind of the secrets of the mind but particular as it affects children, and that is autism. Maybe you saw the cover story of Time magazine a few weeks ago. We've got some experts on autism, and it is a much more positive story than it used to be as we learn to understand it and give children with these special needs the help that they need and deserve.

We are broadcasting remotely from not Seattle where I usually am but about 50, 75 miles away, Fort Worden State Park. And if you ever saw the movie "Officer and a Gentleman" years ago if you're my age or a little younger, "Officer and a Gentleman," Richard Gere, the parade ground, all they were in those beautiful, white uniforms, Richard Gere looked so handsome, that's where I am right now. And it is a beautiful state park and conference center. I urge you if you come to the Pacific Northwest to come here and visit it. It was a military installation until the mid 50s, from back in the turn of the last century. Also if you take one of those cruise ships that goes out of Seattle to Alaska kind of look to the left as you go out to sea because there it is. That's where I am today. And I'll tell you a little more about it if we have time during the shore.

But this is a health and medical show, and a lot of people, maybe 10 million Americas, are cancer survivors. Many of us will have to worry about that in future years, maybe one out of every two men, one out of three women. So the progress that is discussed and where things are headed at the cancer meetings are so critical for us.

Carol Adams Gere works with me also with healthtalk.com. Carol, what is the buzz there at the cancer meeting now?

Carol:

Hi, Andrew. Thank you for having me. Great to be here, and, gosh, the buzz is exciting. The tone is upbeat here. There is so much news being released every day. New prevention strategies for breast and colorectal cancer. So new screening techniques can, as you know, really decrease the recurrence rate and help, as soon as patients are diagnosed at earlier stages, the better their survival rates. So that's the great news there. More research. There is a new vaccine coming out, HPV virus, you'll be hearing about that for cervical cancer. Also combination therapies, targeted therapies is the big buzz word as well, new combination, called dual kinase inhibitors for breast cancer. Very good news there. Also oral agents on the horizon versus IV therapies, which improves quality of care.

Andrew Schorr:

I know, Carol, you and I have talked a lot on healthtalk.com about personalized therapy or helping people get the drugs that work for their cancer type, not all cancers being alike. So is that what continues to be in development, and that is trying to use the combination of drugs that are right for your particular cancer?

Carol:

Exactly, Andrew. Right on. And that's also what the thinking is with these new vaccines, personalized therapy. That they actually take a piece of the tumor and create that vaccine in a manufacturing facility that's personalized for that patient's tumor type. So that's the whole thinking behind the new you vaccine as well as the new targeted therapies. There's more improved outcomes and also less toxicity and side effects with therapy.

Andrew Schorr:

And that's important too is how you can be treated for your cancer but go on with your life while you are and certainly doing that with less toxic therapies or other medicines to support you as you do that.

Well, Carol, would you say that people are upbeat there? I mean, let's face it, you go back a few years and a lot of cancer doctors would kind of hang their head. It wasn't the most positive feel. Does it feel positive there now?

Carol:

Oh, yes, very much so. And what people are really saying now is that there are so many options out there for patients. That's the takeaway. There is a multitude of options, and also patients just need to be knowledgeable. Talk to your doctor, be informed, do the research, and doctors are very open to that.

Andrew Schorr:

Okay. Well, thank you, Carol Adams Gere for calling in. Congratulations with the work and the news you'll be bringing to us on healthtalk.com as well.

Carol:

Right.

Andrew Schorr:

Which is a wonderful resource for people and patients. Carol, have a good meeting. And say hi to all our oncology friends there.

Carol:

I will. Thanks, Andrew.

Advertisement
Join Our Community Register for Events Read Our Latest Blog
Advertisement

Page last updated on