[ Inglese] Yoga Intervention: Research on the Benefits for Patients and Care Partners

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Topics include: Exercise and Fitness

Many lung cancer patients enduring chemotherapy yearn for a feeling of calm and well-being. Can yoga help? Expert Dr. Ishwaria Subbiah, from The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, discusses a preliminary study on the impact of a 12-week structured yoga intervention. Dr. Subbiah explains how practicing yoga can help patients and care partners manage distress from treatment, fatigue, energy and activity level. Patient Power co-founder and care partner, Esther Schorr also shares her experience engaging with yoga and mindfulness, and the effects it has beyond the physical on mood and reducing stress and anxiety. Watch now to find out more.

This is a Patient Empowerment Network program produced by Patient Power. We thank Celgene Corporation, Genentech, Helsinn and Novartis for their support. 

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Transcript

Please remember the opinions expressed on Patient Power are not necessarily the views of our sponsors, contributors, partners or Patient Power. Our discussions are not a substitute for seeking medical advice or care from your own doctor. That’s how you’ll get care that’s most appropriate for you.

Here's a question we got in from Julie.  Julie says, “Is there anything that patients can do to prevent or slow progression?”  So, first of all, there has been a study to show I think preliminarily that yoga, and I'm not sure if it was done at MD Anderson or where it was done, where there was a benefit they said for yoga, for yoga participation, both for the patient and especially the care partner, right?  

Dr. Subbiah:

Absolutely.  And so that study was done at MD Anderson, and it was spearheaded by our department.  So what we wanted to show is that for a person who is going through chemotherapy and radiation for their lung cancer, that would a structured yoga intervention help them as well as their caregivers.  So what you're looking at is an intervention where we not only acknowledge the distress of the person with the cancer and going through treatment but also of the person who is going with them on that journey.  

And so this yoga intervention was structured to be given to both--to be practiced by both the patient as well as their caregiver.  And so it was done for a 12-week period with follow-ups subsequently.  And we were able to show that there was a statistically significant and clinically meaningful difference improvement in the level of fatigue, in the level of activity in that person, which we measured by a 6-minute walk test.  

So if the person was able to do a bit more physically as a consequence of participating in this program when compared to the control arm, which did not receive this structured yoga intervention.  And so there are implications on your functional standards, your mood, your energy level of adopting mind-body practices.  

Andrew Schorr:

And this was done for the caregivers as well, wasn't it?  

Dr. Subbiah:

Absolutely.  And so the caregivers also reported an improvement in their overall mood as a consequence of this.  

Esther Schorr:

And, Andrew, I'd just like to interject as a caregiver, a care partner, and I know that Raquel probably will mention this, but I know that there's a whole range of things that fall into the category of yoga and mindfulness, and again people talk about that, but I know for sure that I have experienced the mind-body connection in controlling anxiety.  The anxiety thoughts about what-if in the future for you, what if for user family, that in the mindfulness and the breathing and the things that come with yoga, not just the positions that you do, and I know we'll talk about that, but it's more about centering your thinking more positively and turning inward and visualizing good.  

Please remember the opinions expressed on Patient Power are not necessarily the views of our sponsors, contributors, partners or Patient Power. Our discussions are not a substitute for seeking medical advice or care from your own doctor. That’s how you’ll get care that’s most appropriate for you.

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Page last updated on June 26, 2019