[ Inglese] How Do Young Adults With Multiple Myeloma Tolerate Treatment?

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Topics include: Treatment and Understanding

Young adults with multiple myeloma may want to know if researchers have identified unique disease characteristics within their age group. Do younger myeloma patients respond to treatment differently? Myeloma experts Dr. Jonathan Kaufman, from the Winship Cancer Institute, and Dr. Rafael Fonseca, from the Mayo Clinic in Arizona, discuss the average age of diagnosis and how common it is for patients to be diagnosed under 40. They also share current data sets of younger patient populations on treatment tolerability.

This town meeting is sponsored by Amgen, Janssen Pharmaceuticals and Adaptive Biotechnologies. It is produced by Patient Power in partnership with Winship Cancer Institute of Emory University.

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Produced in association with Winship Cancer Institute

Transcript

Please remember the opinions expressed on Patient Power are not necessarily the views of our sponsors, contributors, partners or Patient Power. Our discussions are not a substitute for seeking medical advice or care from your own doctor. That’s how you’ll get care that’s most appropriate for you.

Jack Aiello:

Sheridan asks, I noticed the patients on the panel were diagnosed relatively young.  What do we know about myeloma in younger adults versus older adults?  Want to talk about that, Dr. Kaufman?  

Dr. Kaufman:

Yeah.  Myeloma on average is diagnosed in patients in their mid to late 60s, possibly early 70s, but there is a small percentage of patients under 40 who are—under 50 is uncommon, under 40 is rare, but there are patients who are diagnosed at a very young age. 

If you look at large data sets, younger—the younger patients on average do better than older patients. And the biology of myeloma of the young is just as varied and as the biology of myeloma as older.  We haven't identified unique characteristics of young patients.  

Jack Aiello:

So we don't know why they do better.  

Dr. Kaufman:

We don't know—well, they probably do better, because they're otherwise healthier on average.   

Dr. Fonseca:

If I can add a quick comment to that.  

Jack Aiello:

Yeah.  

Dr. Fonseca:

It's a little obscure so it's not—but there are some of the genetic subtypes that are more favorable are very common in the very elderly, if you may, but what happens is younger patients, even they don't necessarily have those favorable subtypes, they can go through more intense treatments and tolerate treatments better, which also makes a big difference.  

Please remember the opinions expressed on Patient Power are not necessarily the views of our sponsors, contributors, partners or Patient Power. Our discussions are not a substitute for seeking medical advice or care from your own doctor. That’s how you’ll get care that’s most appropriate for you.

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Page last updated on February 4, 2019