[ Anglais] Ed’s Story: The Impact of Modern Medicine and Clinical Trials on My Lung Cancer

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Topics include: Treatment and Patient Stories

Meet Ed Cutler, a lung cancer survivor and advocate from Tampa, Fla., as he shares the ups and downs of his treatment journey; from standard chemotherapy to participating in two clinical trials, to help others understand the positive impact innovative therapies can have. Ed walks through his experience developing chemo-resistance, dealing with treatment toxicities and finding a more effective immunotherapy in a clinical trial. Watch now to find out more.

This is a Patient Empowerment Network program produced by Patient Power, in partnership with Moffitt Cancer Center. We thank AbbVie, Inc., Celgene Corporation, Foundation Medicine, and Novartis for their support.

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Transcript

Please remember the opinions expressed on Patient Power are not necessarily the views of our sponsors, contributors, partners or Patient Power. Our discussions are not a substitute for seeking medical advice or care from your own doctor. That’s how you’ll get care that’s most appropriate for you.

Andrew Schorr:

So, let’s meet a patient from Tampa who’s been living with lung cancer for a number of years, Ed Cutler. Ed, thank you so much for joining us on this program and we’re gonna share your story. Hi, Ed. 

Ed Cutler:                    

Hi. It’s a pleasure to be here and an honor to be honest with you.’

Andrew Schorr:          

Well, Ed, so, you’ve been living with lung cancer how many years now?

Ed Cutler:                    

Just over five years. 

Andrew Schorr:          

Okay. But let’s face it, it wasn’t that long ago if somebody was told they had lung cancer they were not long for this world with more advanced lung cancer. So, modern medicine has made a big difference for you, hasn’t it? 

Ed Cutler:                    

It certainly has. When I received my diagnosis, I was given the quote average life expectancy statistics and they didn’t look very good.

Andrew Schorr:          

Right.

Ed Cutler:                    

So, I went the whole way. 

Andrew Schorr:          

And we should mention that for the last couple years you’ve been in a clinical trial and it’s an immunotherapy. And we’re gonna talk about immunotherapy along the way. We’re gonna talk about target therapies, immunotherapies. The doctors are gonna help us understand this whole idea of precision medicine. Which means, “How do you get what’s right for you?” 

And you’ve had some changes along the way, right Ed? I mean there you are in Tampa continuing your work as a tax consultant, I know. And been married more than 50 years to Donna, which is great. Children and grandchildren. But you’ve had kind of a journey that’s had changes along the way, right?

Ed Cutler:                    

It has been a journey. Yeah. Yeah. Initially I started out with standard of care chemotherapy. And that basically took over 16 months. Basically, the first two or three months I was on the full medication of three drugs. And then they dropped off one and then I was on maintenance. But at the end of the 16thmonth they discovered that there was a new tumor. And I was told I was now chemo-resistant and that was the end of chemotherapy for me.

So, my etiologist and I sat down, and we started searching. And at that point, I don’t think there were any other approved medications. Everything else I think was still in trials at the time. Now I know that there are maybe two, three, a half a dozen medications that are out of trials and FDA-approved. But at that time, I was limited to clinical trials. And Dr. Tan, who is my oncologist, gave me the options looking at two or three different trials. And my goal was to live as long as possible with good quality of life. And that’s what I was looking for in each of the trial descriptions.  

And we ended up selecting one and I took all of the various testing to qualify for that trial and I was ultimately accepted. It was a two-drug combination of infusion. And unfortunately, I only lasted seven—roughly seven months in that trial because of side effects that almost killed me. 

Andrew Schorr:          

But now there’s another trial?

Ed Cutler:                    

And, fortunately, it took another few months, but we located another trial that was being performed only at Moffitt. I said, “Well, that’s convenient.” So, I said, “Yeah.” Everything looked good on that. Sure, there were potential side effects, but I was willing to take my chances with it. And here I am nearly three years into that trial and I’ve been stable most of that three-year period. There was a little bit of tumor size reduction initially and basically stable the rest of the time. It’ll be three years come the end of January.

Andrew Schorr:          

That’s such great news.

So, Dr. Gray, you have lots of trials at a major center like Moffitt, maybe you could just tell us in this world of lung cancer, patients who participate in trials have not only paved the way for everybody, but it’s given them great hope, hasn’t it?

Dr. Gray:                     

Absolutely. So, we have a lot of trials at Moffitt. We try to organize ourselves within a way of doing a personalized medicine approach. And basically, that means that any patient that comes to Moffitt we wanna give them the best treatment possible. And many times, that is a clinical trial. With clinical trials a lot of times you have access to more novel agents and things that you can’t necessarily get through your regular route through FDA approval. And also, a lot of that work is spurred by research developed here at Moffitt and partnering with the basic science researchers as well as us at a lot of the clinical – on the clinical side and making sure that we move these drugs forward and into the clinic for patients.  

And Edward, I just wanna say I’m very happy about your story. And thank you for taking the time today to be with us and to share your journey with us. And give us your perspectives to this, too.

Please remember the opinions expressed on Patient Power are not necessarily the views of our sponsors, contributors, partners or Patient Power. Our discussions are not a substitute for seeking medical advice or care from your own doctor. That’s how you’ll get care that’s most appropriate for you.

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Page last updated on February 14, 2019