[ Inglés] When Should Lung Cancer Patients Get Genetic Testing?

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Topics include: Ask the Expert

When is the optimal time for lung cancer patients to receive genetic testing? How does understanding your genomic profile influence treatment decisions? Noted lung cancer expert Dr. Lecia Sequist, from Harvard Medical School, and Janet Freeman-Daily, patient advocate and stage IV lung cancer survivor, discuss the value of modern tests in distinguishing subtypes and finding a corresponding therapy, and share resources where patients can find information on lung cancer genetics and genetic mutations.Watch now to learn more.

The Living Well With Lung Cancer series is a Patient Empowerment Network program produced by Patient Power. We thank Celgene Corporation, Genentech, Helsinn and Novartis for their support.

 

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Transcript

Please remember the opinions expressed on Patient Power are not necessarily the views of our sponsors, contributors, partners or Patient Power. Our discussions are not a substitute for seeking medical advice or care from your own doctor. That’s how you’ll get care that’s most appropriate for you.

Andrew Schorr:

So, Janet, what do you tell people, what do you want to tell our viewers who were probably treated at least initially at a community center and they have no clue whether they have some subtype, rare or not, of be lung cancer and what to do about it?  Janet?  

Janet Freeman-Daily:

If a person has lung cancer and it's non-small cell lung cancer, you should have gotten genomic testing at some point. And if you didn't, you need to ask your doctor about that.  If your doctor is not familiar with it, and some of the general practitioners and community oncologists may not be as comfortable with it as other lung cancer specialists, then get a second opinion, preferably at a major academic cancer center.  

If you want to learn more about this, there are a large number of online patient groups where you can ask questions and get educated about this, or you can go to websites of some of the lung cancer advocacy organizations like LUNGevity, Lung Cancer Foundation of America.  They have a good deal of information where you can start learning about things to get yourself educated on the topic.  

It's—I still hear patients who are stage IV lung cancer, and their doctor sent them home on hospice without ever doing genomic testing.  It's really important that you make sure you get the tests that are in the standard of care. 

Andrew Schorr:

So, Dr. Sequist, just back to you.  This genomic testing is to see, is there an oncogene or cancer gene that's driving your cancer that either an approved or maybe a clinical trial experimental medicine may target, right?  Okay? 

Dr. Sequist:

That's correct.  And, as Janet was saying, it's vitally important for every patient that's diagnosed to get tested at a minimum for the genes that correspond to FDA-approved medications, but there are several second-tier mutations that I believe everyone should be tested for because there are clinical trials that even if it's not available at the community site where they first sought care hopefully it's available someplace that's not too terribly far from where they live.

Please remember the opinions expressed on Patient Power are not necessarily the views of our sponsors, contributors, partners or Patient Power. Our discussions are not a substitute for seeking medical advice or care from your own doctor. That’s how you’ll get care that’s most appropriate for you.

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Page last updated on September 9, 2019