Two years ago Ralph Goodman, 62, of Bellevue, Washington was told his episodes of dizziness and lapses in focus were indications of the most serious diagnosis, an inoperable form of brain cancer. Some people would have emotionally crumbled, knocked to the floor and unable to get up. Not Ralph. While he was shocking and upset, he soon moved on to a much healthier view of his situation. This week I interviewed Ralph, a man I've known for years through our synagogue. Ralph was happy to tell his story of traveling the world as a young man, reaching success in sales...

Read Blog

He was calling in from a hotel room in San Francisco. I was sitting alone at the microphone 2,500 miles away at an office conference table in Ann Arbor, Michigan. His words of wisdom pierced the night, and I hoped people around the world were listening. We called him "Bob" because he still worried what he was about to share could limit his future job possibilities. His subject was anxiety and depression and having the courage to get help. Right at the outset Bob marveled that years ago, when depression first was debilitating at age 19, he never "in a...

Read Blog

At the Healthcare Internet Conference" near Orlando, FL – We've talked before about how the days of "The Doctor as God" or "I'm the Doctor, You're Not" is over. But some major hospitals are having trouble putting the patient in "first position" on their websites even though their stated mission is to put patients first. Over the years it has been patient care that has been valued. That has not been necessarily true for hearing from patients, featuring patient stories and photos, or encouraging patients to talk to other patients publically or have an active online give and take with...

Read Blog

Andrew's Blog: Overcoming the Impossible: Life After Illness from Patient Power® on Vimeo.

Read Blog

As I write this, we still don't know the results of the national and state elections. It will all be determined this week. And while the people we elect to lead us have many, many issues to tackle, we are focused on healthcare. We can only hope the folks who are elected can help improve on the situation we have now. Issue #1 of course, is that many Americans either have no health insurance or lack adequate insurance. Issue #2 is the cost of prescription medicines. Drugs cost hundreds of millions to develop and when they come to market it's...

Read Blog

The television commercials are captivating: How ordinary people - many of them "Real Americans" in Sarah Palin's terms – find themselves with insufficient insurance coverage or no insurance to cover a medical event. There are more than 40 million Americans like this, and it is a situation we have to solve in the near-term. So we at Patient Power have wanted to do our part to promote a dialogue about this in much greater depth than the TV spots. After all, Michael Moore goes on "The Larry King Show," and the AMA has a project "Voices for the Uninsured," and...

Read Blog

When I was diagnosed with leukemia in 1996 I knew nothing about the disease except that it was deadly. I also didn't know anyone with the condition, chronic lymphocytic leukemia. So, with help from a neighbor, I went on the Internet, found the right listerv on www.acor.org, and started corresponding with people with my condition around the country. A couple of times I spoke on the phone with some of them and that was great. Before long, a group of us posted photos so we could get a handle on what we all looked like and admire each other's families....

Read Blog

It started on the flight from Seattle to Santa Barbara, California the other morning. The woman sitting next to me shared that she was flying down to visit her ailing 88-year-old father who was being admitted to hospice. Up until recently, she explained, he was a very vibrant senior – a former IRS accounting expert who "retired" only to teach college and also to celebrate health every morning with his buddies at the gym. Then came early stage colon cancer and agreement he'd have minimally invasive surgery to get rid of it. That's when things turned "south." From a casual...

Read Blog

Let me start by saying a diagnosis of breast cancer can be terrifying. But so is a diagnosis of lung cancer, or leukemia, or multiple sclerosis. So here we are in October again – Breast Cancer Awareness Month – and the world is turning pink. Pink ribbons, pink yogurt, and this summer we had pink baseball bats. I am not critical of the power of breast cancer awareness nor the marketing pile-on by corporate America. But I grieve that most other conditions are left in the dust. As I was reminded in our webcast last week on advanced lung cancer,...

Read Blog

Swirling around the great debates about our economy, and real worries and financial turmoil, are the very basic issues of individuals in America getting the healthcare they need – and deserve. This was brought home to me yet again this past Saturday evening when, as a local board member of the Leukemia and Lymphoma Society, I attended their "Light the Night" walk in Tacoma, Washington. That's where I met 30-year-old Jamie Johnston. Jamie is a mother of a second-grade girl and a stay-at-home mom. She is also a 2-year AML leukemia survivor who had no health insurance. It all started...

Read Blog
November 2008
S M T W T F S
< Oct   Dec
  1
2 3 4 5 6 7 8
9 10 11 12 13 14 15
16 17 18 19 20 21 22
23 24 25 26 27 28 29
30  

Archive

more reset

Page last updated on March 7, 2017