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The Journal of Participatory Medicine

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Participatory Evidence: Opportunities & Threats

In medicine, evidence separates modern scientific treatment from Folk Art. Medical evidence is acquired through observation, experimentation, and information sharing in scientific peer-reviewed journals. When new treatments are used, millions of patients around the world provide additional evidence for what works and what doesn't.

In our new world of instant information exchange and empowered patients, how are clinicians and empowered patients challenging traditional ways to collect, evaluate, and publish evidence? What evidence should we trust? This program, moderated by Peter Frishauf, frames the issues and proposes at least one solution to sorting through the evidence puzzle.

Full Program (58:19)
Participatory Evidence: Opportunities & Threats
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Guests:

Peter Frishauf, Founder of Medscape
Richard Smith, M.D., Director of the Ovations Initiative
Jessie Gruman, Ph.D., President, Center for the Advancement of Health
Larry Green, DrPH, ScD(Hon.), Professor of Epidemiology and Biostatstics, UCSF Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center

A Peer Review Discussion

Can we trust traditional peer review? If it’s broken, how might we fix it?

These questions are put to a panel of experts in this Journal of Participatory Medicine podcast. The spirited discussion accompanies 2 articles on the subject in JPM’s inaugural issue: In Search of an Optimal Peer Review System, by former British Medical Journal editor, Richard Smith, and Reputation Systems: A New Vision for Publishing and Peer Review by Medscape founder Peter Frishauf.

In addition to Smith and Frishauf, participating in the podcast are peer review researcher Liz Wager, health policy researcher Alex Jadad, and computer scientist Thomas (Bo) Adler. More complete bios may be found here.

While there are many views on getting to a better form of peer review, the panelists agreed on a number of criteria that ideal peer review should include. Bo Adler and Frishauf led a discussion on specific improvements that might come about through an Internet-base reputation system that is now being beta tested in Wikipedia.

Chapter 1
Defining the Problems and Issues with Peer Review Today
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Chapter 2
Light Versus Heavy Peer Review
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Chapter 3
Transparency in Peer Review
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Chapter 4
Wikipedia-Style Peer Review…and Rating/Reputation Systems
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Chapter 5
Crowdsourcing Research/Peer Review
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Chapter 6
Building a Community
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Full Discussion (1:17:53)
A Peer Review Discussion
Download | Stream | Transcript

Notice: Patient Power, LLC is solely responsible for the content of webcasts and replays and transcripts on this site. Information here is for educational purposes only. Please check with your own doctor for medical advice that is right for you.

The The Journal of Participatory Medicine was launched October 22, 2009 at the Connected Health symposium in Boston. It is a free, online, peer-reviewed journal dedicated to documenting how health care encourages, supports and expects active involvement by all parties, and leads to improved outcomes. An interdisciplinary publication founded, written, edited, and reviewed by health professionals, patient advocates, and researchers, the journal will explore how participation affects outcomes, resources, and relationships in health care; which interventions increase participation; and the types of evidence that provide the most reliable answers. The intent of the journal is to explore the extent to which shared decision-making in health care, and deep patient engagement, affect outcomes.

The mission of the parent Society of Participatory Medicine is to transform the culture of medicine – with stakeholders ranging from patients, caregivers, health care professionals, payers and purchasers – to be more participatory. Doing so, as the saying goes, will take a village — perhaps even a large metropolitan area! While the journal does not require subscription or registration, individual and organizational support via society membership is encouraged.

Journal co-editors Jessie Gruman, PhD, and Charles W. Smith, MD, represent the patient advocacy and health care professional sides of the equation. They, and deputy editor Alan Greene, MD, invite online submissions, based on the parameters of participatory medicine described on the site. Content will include research articles, state-of-the-art reviews, editorials, narratives, case studies, tutorials, media commentary, and technology, product and website reviews – in print and multimedia formats. Interactivity and user participation will be encouraged and supported.

Patient Power® is America's most prominent series of live talk shows on medical and health issues from the patient's perspective and featuring some of the nation's most credible medical experts and inspiring patients. Online from his Seattle studio on regularly scheduled webcasts Andrew explores in-depth health issues that affect you or someone you care about and helps you make smart decisions that can lead to better health. Listen in and call in and please, tell your friends about Patient Power. There's nothing like it!

All replays are archived on this site.

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Page last updated on November 11, 2010